Tag Archives: underground mines

Alexandre Cervinka CEO Newtrax

Conquering the world from deep down underground mines

LaPresse Interviews Newtrax CEO Alexandre Cervinka

Alexandre Cervinka CEO Newtrax

Conquering the world from deep down underground mines

For the original article in French click here.

There are 719 underground mines in operation around the globe, and Newtrax, a Montreal-based technology company founded in 2008, has implemented its safety and productivity solutions in 98 of them.

The goal is to be present is 400 of these mines in the next 3 years. Newtrax ranked 166th among the 500 fastest-growing technology companies in North America last year, according to Deloitte’s Fast 500, and its CEO has no plans to slow down this growth.

Over the years, Quebec has acquired real expertise in the mining sector. Is that why you decided to develop technologies specific to this field of activity? Did you have any prior geology knowledge?

Not at all. In 2001, I was a graduate in Electrical Engineering from McGill University and, with a few colleagues, started a business that used wireless sensor networks to recover stolen merchandise. Then, we developed a technology for the transport of goods and another for border surveillance. We developed projects, but not products.

Eventually, a professor from the University of Quebec in Abitibi suggested we apply our technologies to the mining sector. In 2008, we developed solutions that made it possible to better monitor the work that was being done in the heart of the mine, where telecommunications are impossible.

Our first order from a mining company in Chile, and that’s how Newtrax was born.

What kind of innovation did you bring to this industry that had previously operated in a rather traditional and archaic way?

The managers did not know what was going on in the mine in real time. They would be given a report when the workers came out after their shift. That’s all. They had no idea what was happening with the machines, with the workers, or with the environment in which people operated. We brought them the light, nothing less.

Systems have been developed to evaluate ground stability, air quality and water levels in real time using sensors that are installed in the underground mine. We have also developed sensors that measure the health and parameters of machines, to know the distance drilled, the tonnage moved by the trucks.

Workers have been equipped with a chip that allows them to be located wherever they are in the mine and to be detected in blind spots by large mobile equipment.

Mine managers are given solutions that allow them to better plan the maintenance of their equipment, increase the productivity of their operations while ensuring worker safety.

Your solutions have been well received by the major mining companies, as evidenced by the sharp increase in your revenues over the past year. Where are you in your development?

In 2008, we were eight employees, including the two founders, Vincent Kassis and myself. We got our first big contract with Mexican producer Fresnillo, the biggest money producer in the world, and since then, business has never stopped growing.

We have reached 140 employees, 75 of whom work at our Montreal head office to develop our existing and new technology solutions. Our systems are being assembled by three companies in the Montreal region, and onsite installation and training are being carried out in underground mines. We plan to hire 40 people this year, half of them in Montreal and the other half in our six offices in Santiago, London, Johannesburg, Moscow and Perth.

Our customers are the major producers of gold, silver, and nickel from around the world. These companies are concerned about their productivity and the safety of their operations. Our systems are installed in 98 underground mines and we expect to be present in 400 mines within three years, especially because we have just signed an agreement with Sandvik, the world’s largest manufacturer of underground mining equipment.

Sandvik is present in the 719 operating mines and we plan on becoming the nervous system of its machines. It opens up incredible opportunities. Our sales are expected to reach $ 100 million over the next three years.

How do you finance your growth? Have you opened your capital to financial groups?

We financed our growth from the sales that we made. We also received a good boost from investor Robert Brouillette, founder of the law firm BCF and recognized Angel Investor, who still accompanies us today.

A new shareholder was welcomed in 2014, when Australian mining fund Resource Capital Funds launched a mining technology fund that took a 30% stake in Newtrax.

What will be the next step in terms of growth at Newtrax?

We are already in it. Our technology solutions generate a lot of data and we will generate even more because of our association with Sandvik and its visualization platform. We have also partnered with the IVADO to develop machine learning solutions for our clients worldwide.

We have our foot in the door. We aren’t focused on generating revenue in the AI / Machine Learning sector but we are convinced that AI will further advance intelligent mining solutions for the future.

Improving Overall Equipment Effectiveness in Underground Mines with Newtrax

Improving Overall Equipment Effectiveness in Underground Mines with Newtrax

“Based on our benchmarking, we observe a global average overall equipment effectiveness (OEE) performance of 27 percent for underground mining, 39 percent for open-pit mining… compared with 92 percent for oil refining”

-McKinsey Global Institute 2016

The term “Overall Equipment Effectiveness (OEE)” draws its origin from the manufacturing industry, and its significance to the underground mining industry is easily transferable.

Measuring Overall Equipment Efficiency for underground mining equipment is becoming best practice in benchmarking progress, identifying losses, and improving the productivity of a fleet.

Most underground mines in the process of digitalizing their operation face similar challenges:

  •     Having a multi-OEM mix of mobile equipment; producing  unstandardized data
  •     The inability to collect real-time data from all the faces, including development faces
  •     Having data, but not knowing how to transform the information into actionable solutions

Newtrax has developed an array of OEE solutions to address these challenges.

The following highlight some of Newtrax OEE successes:

OEE Overall Equipment Effectiveness

Improved Hauling Efficiency: Case Study

A mining operation with a mixed fleet of mobile trucks, including CAT AD30s and Atlas MT436s, was looking for a solution to establish standardized payload monitoring systems.

Newtrax installed its Mobile Equipment Telemetry (MET) system, which interfaced with the original equipment manufacturer (OEM)’s existing sensor network. Newtrax also installed an availability switch, onboard payload scales, and an external/internal payload scoreboard. The payload information was retrofitted to display on the OEM’s load cells.

Four trucks were monitored closely for an eight week period with the approach to Measure, Manage, and Improve using the traditional OEE calculation.

OEE = Availability(A)% x Utilization(U)% x Haulage Efficiency(Q)%

After the eight week period of data collection and observation, it was reported that Availability Time (A) was 93% and the Utilization Time (U) was 52% of the mine’s standard production time calendar. Analysis of the equipment’s payload data over the same time period showed a Haulage Efficiency (Q) of 64% with 19.4 tons out of 30 tons capacity.

These passively measured data points showed the operations OEE being 31%.

Using the information collected, the haulage efficiency data point became a key area of focus in improving efficiencies within the workflow.

SOLUTION:

To improve truck effectiveness, Newtrax proposed an increase to the dumper bed wall height to accommodate extra buckets, as well as digital scoreboards on the trucks’ cab for LHD, and an alarm system on each truck to initiate an overloading situation warning.

Conclusion

  • You can’t improve what you can’t measure
  • Technology is available to overcome stumbling blocks, and enable the management of mixed equipment fleets, through the use of timely data from active areas
  • Offering actionable insight to both mine managers and operators will deliver significant value in a short period of time
  • Improved haulage efficiency will ensure UG mining effectiveness is increased above 27%
Loads per cycle Sco

Why Measuring Loads Per Cycle is so Important in Underground Mining Part 2

Why Measuring Loads Per Cycle is so Important in Underground Mining (PART 2)

Loads per cycle Sco

If read our previous blog post, Glencore Matagami mine has recently been able to observe some great productivity ROIs since using the Newtrax Mobile Equipment Telemetry system.  This included:

  • a 5-6%  increase in Utilization on their ore haulage
  • a 4% increase in their Overall Equipment Effectiveness (OEE)
  • a 5% increase in their Loads per Cycle

In this blog post we will explore Part 2 of the Q&A on the the topic of Loads per Cycle with one of our experts on the subject, Craig Banks, VP Canada-USA at Newtrax.

Q: What are the advantages of the Newtrax MET system?

A: You know the old saying you can’t manage what you can’t measure? The whole point of the Newtrax MET system deployed at Matagami as well as in other mines around the world is to collect measurable information and make it available for analysis and for management decision-making. Matagami has a wonderful set of reports and dashboards that are visible to their management team and soon to be on a TV screen so that they use them during the morning huddles. It facilitates communication at the end of the day. Whether we’re talking about the reports, the dashboard, the management layer, the analysis, it’s all about facilitating communication, understanding how your operations are going for real. It facilitates communication backed by data from the Newtrax system, and you can really take it to next level and make a meaningful change to a mining operation.

Q: What are some benefits a mine can see from Newtrax systems?

A: Case in point here was Matagami. They use both 45-tonne and 60-tonne trucks, which are impressively large trucks for underground mines. What we’ve achieved with the system that was deployed specifically with loads per cycle at Matagami was a 5% to 6% increase in loads per cycle. And you know what does that means? Well, that can mean extra several tons per cycle. And on a long, long cycle, like what they’re talking about at Matagami, that’s a massive improvement. We’re talking $3,000 per truck cycle, compared to a non-optimized payload.

Q: Are there any new sensor technologies on the horizon?

A: There’s an emerging payload system technology that we’re now using, and deploying in some cases, which uses sensors mounted on truck axles. When you load a haul truck, the axle does deflect even if it’s only a little bit. So what we’re doing is we’re putting sensors on the truck axles, and as the axles flex, ever so slightly, were able to record that and correlate the deflection of the axle back to the payload in the back of the truck. And of course, there’s some clever algorithms there to smooth out what happens as the truck driving goes up and down hitting rock. But what we’re able to do is use it as an alternative system. And what we’re finding is it’s an easier to install and easier to maintain system than the load cell plus pin, and it’s a relative newcomer. But you know, as this stage early indicators show that the results for accuracy and systems maintenance are very positive going forward.

Q: And what’s next for measuring loads per cycle?

A: Going forward to the future of measuring loads per cycle will be to offer different calibration systems, different payload systems, technology-wise, but also make all that data available to facilitate communication. The same way we’re doing it today but with additional types of technology and deployment on these vehicles. The whole goal here is whenever the technology is taking the measurement, make that data available, make sure it’s as rich as possible—because the richer the data, the more analysis you can do. We of course can’t ignore the emergence of Machine Learning and AI,  that need really good data to work. And that’s what we’re generating here for companies like Matagami.

Why Measuring Loads Per Cycle is so Important in Underground Mining Part 1

Why Measuring Loads Per Cycle is so Important in Underground Mining

Glencore Matagami mine has recently been able to observe some great productivity ROIs since using the Newtrax Mobile Equipment Telemetry system.  This included:

  • a 5-6%  increase in Utilization on their ore haulage
  • a 4% increase in their Overall Equipment Effectiveness (OEE)
  • a 5% increase in their Loads per Cycle

In this blog post we will dive deeper into the topic of Loads per Cycle by sharing a Q&A with one of our experts on the subject, Craig Banks, VP Canada-USA at Newtrax.

Q: What are loads per cycle?

A: Put plainly, loads per cycle is a measure of haul truck efficiency. Or at least that’s how it’s used in underground mines. In terms of recent Newtrax client engagement such as Matagami, loads per cycle is average payload, literally the weight of the rock carried in a haul truck during one trip from the active mining area to a stockpile, or to a waste dump. This is most often measured in tonnes, and it has a variant which can be either represented by actual tonnes or a percentage.

Q: At a mine, how do you measure loads per cycle?

A: There are several ways to do it. One method that’s commonly used in surface mines is to have a truck scale at static locations in the mine, somewhat like a truck scale on the side of a highway that measures the weight of a loaded truck. In mining, principally in surface mine where a loaded truck would drive up onto a scale, you would weigh the entire thing. Knowing the approximate weight of a truck, you can actually figure out what the resulting payload is. So that’s kind of the way it’s been done for a long time, there’s a few limitations with that type of system.

Q: What are those limitations, is there a better time to measure the load?

A: Traditionally, systems give you a payload per cycle, or a load per cycle, but it’s measured during the cycle. So a truck that has a 45-tonne capacity might have 42 tonnes in its bed. Knowing that is great, but you can’t do anything about it. Because it’s measured halfway through the cycle, you can’t add material to the truck. Having the measurement at the loading stage, which is what Newtrax has done at Matagami, enables the operators to do something about it.

Q: What can be done with all this data?

A: Having all these rich sets of data allows companies like Newtrax to apply machine learning algorithms to build intelligence down the road. So, your mine planning engineers would look at that information and say, “Well, in the future, we need to plan better” or “In the future, this operator needs to be trained to do it differently.” That’s kind of the historical and the analytical end of it. But by recording data the way we do it, not only do you make it available for a rich data set for analysis, but you also make it available to operators, even real or near real time so that they can actually do something about it. And in underground mines, the supervisor isn’t sitting there watching. You’re lucky if the supervisor sees the operator once a day. So the decisions need to happen with the operator, where they can see what’s going on and intervene. It’s both an analytics tool so you can do your planning better and it’s a production tool.

Q: At Matagami, Newtrax has installed scoreboards on the trucks. What are the benefits of these scoreboards?

A: It’s funny in that we get either lovers or haters immediately and we always convert them over because scoreboards are awesome. But the truth is, payload systems have had in-dash scoreboards for quite some time on surface mines but they’re not always used well. If you just have it shown to the truck driver, you kind of have to go back to who’s in charge of the loading event: is it the truck driver or is it the loader operator? Frequently most of the time it’s the loader operator. And so if the information is visible only to the truck driver, probably nobody’s going to do anything about it. The idea of putting the scoreboard on the side of the truck is it facilitates communication between the two operators; it makes it so that as a loader operator is putting the payload in the back of the truck, you’re seeing in real time what that payload looks like. And so if you get the third bucket in the back of the truck and you happen to load lower density material than usual, you might have a little bit more space, maybe there’s an opportunity to do something about it. The loader operator and the truck driver looking at the same information are forced to have a conversation. So the first thing they do is they get on the radio and say “Hey, look, hang on a sec, I might be able to squeeze a little bit more in there.” And they do.

Stay tuned for part 2 of this Q&A coming out shortly!

Improving Overall Equipment Effectiveness in Underground Mines with Newtrax

Improving Overall Equipment Effectiveness in Underground Mines with Newtrax

“Based on our benchmarking, we observe a global average overall equipment effectiveness (OEE) performance of 27 percent for underground mining, 39 percent for open-pit mining… compared with 92 percent for oil refining”

-McKinsey Global Institute 2016

The term “Overall Equipment Effectiveness (OEE)” draws its origin from the manufacturing industry, and its significance to the underground mining industry is easily transferable.

Measuring Overall Equipment Efficiency for underground mining equipment is becoming best practice in benchmarking progress, identifying losses, and improving the productivity of a fleet.

Most underground mines in the process of digitalizing their operation face similar challenges:

  •     Having a multi-OEM mix of mobile equipment; producing  unstandardized data
  •     The inability to collect real-time data from all the faces, including development faces
  •     Having data, but not knowing how to transform the information into actionable solutions

Newtrax has developed an array of OEE solutions to address these challenges.

The following highlight some of Newtrax OEE successes:

OEE Overall Equipment Effectiveness

Improved Hauling Efficiency: Case Study

A mining operation with a mixed fleet of mobile trucks, including CAT AD30s and Atlas MT436s, was looking for a solution to establish standardized payload monitoring systems.

Newtrax installed its Mobile Equipment Telemetry (MET) system, which interfaced with the original equipment manufacturer (OEM)’s existing sensor network. Newtrax also installed an availability switch, onboard payload scales, and an external/internal payload scoreboard. The payload information was retrofitted to display on the OEM’s load cells.

Four trucks were monitored closely for an eight week period with the approach to Measure, Manage, and Improve using the traditional OEE calculation.

OEE = Availability(A)% x Utilization(U)% x Haulage Efficiency(Q)%

After the eight week period of data collection and observation, it was reported that Availability Time (A) was 93% and the Utilization Time (U) was 52% of the mine’s standard production time calendar. Analysis of the equipment’s payload data over the same time period showed a Haulage Efficiency (Q) of 64% with 19.4 tons out of 30 tons capacity.

These passively measured data points showed the operations OEE being 31%.

Using the information collected, the haulage efficiency data point became a key area of focus in improving efficiencies within the workflow.

SOLUTION:

To improve truck effectiveness, Newtrax proposed an increase to the dumper bed wall height to accommodate extra buckets, as well as digital scoreboards on the trucks’ cab for LHD, and an alarm system on each truck to initiate an overloading situation warning.

Conclusion

  • You can’t improve what you can’t measure
  • Technology is available to overcome stumbling blocks, and enable the management of mixed equipment fleets, through the use of timely data from active areas
  • Offering actionable insight to both mine managers and operators will deliver significant value in a short period of time
  • Improved haulage efficiency will ensure UG mining effectiveness is increased above 27%
INDABA, Newtrax, Cape Town, Mining

Join Newtrax at the Mining INDABA in Cape Town February 4-7

Join Newtrax at the Mining INDABA in Cape Town February 4-7

INDABA, Newtrax, Cape Town, Mining

Newtrax is attending the 25th Anniversary Mining INDABA in Cape Town from Monday, February 4th to Thursday, February 7th, 2019.

With the world’s largest gathering of the most influential stakeholders in African mining, we are looking forward to talking about the future of digitalization with our peers. Newtrax’s Luke Clements (VP Africa) and Trent Jackson (APAC Sales Manager) will be in attendance and welcome the opportunity to meet with customers and prospects.

If you’re interested in how Newtrax can help in your mines digitalization, please contact lclements@newtrax.com to schedule a meeting.

Data collection mining

How Data Collection and AI Will Change The Future of Mine Safety and Profitability

How Data Collection and AI Will Change The Future of Mine Safety and Profitability

Data collection mining

1.  Safety in Mines

Data collection and analysis, especially with the availability of AI algorithms, makes it easier to foresee possible risks that can arise in underground mines, and prevent them.  Predictive maintenance would be the best example of this. According to the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, companies with a 9% reactive maintenance rate had a recordable incident rate of .1%, while those with a 64% reactive maintenance had a recordable incident rate of 4.3%.

These statistics highlight how having reliable equipment is safer.  Interpreting real-time data on your equipment and how they interact in the mining environment keeps everyone safer in the mine.  These algorithms are preparing today for the future needs of safety compliance in safety and prevention.

2.   Mining Productivity and Profitability

Productivity in mines is lower than in other industries, and working underground creates a gap of knowledge transfer between supervisors of different areas of the mine in real-time.  Decisions are made while there are still variables which are unknown. Data collection and analysis however, makes it possible to have a global view of situations for better decision making. There are serious cost savings when you can make important decisions with a full and clear picture in mind.

— Download the Slide Deck to Learn How Use AI on Mining Data To Create Value In Less Than 3 Months —

Download the AI Slide Deck To Learn More

This AI Slide Deck prepared by Newtrax VP of Artificial Intelligence, Michel Dubois, shows how to create value with data collected in underground mines using Artificial Intelligence algorithms.

3. Data collection for Mining

Mines have started digitalizing their fleets and collecting data.  This is where data contextualization comes in. Through the fleet and network agnostic systems at Newtrax for example, the data collected can be connected and contextualized.  Being able to have the full context of any piece of data will bring more possibilities and using trends and algorithms trained by multiple mines can help predict events in any given mine.

Mining will be much more calculated in the next 5 – 10 years, this means knowing exactly what is going on under the surface from to make the mine safer, more profitable and understanding how all of these elements interact with each other to have the most productive operation possible.

EMESRT Level 9 - Intervention Controls for Collision Avoidance

EMESRT Level 9 – Intervention Controls for Collision Avoidance

EMESRT Level 9 - Intervention Controls for Collision Avoidance

EMESRT Level 9 - Intervention Controls for Collision Avoidance

In February 2015, the government of South Africa made unprecedented news when it amended the Mine Health and Safety Act, placing regulations related to mine machinery and equipment.

From 2004‐2009, 35% of fatalities at mine sites were due to vehicle interaction incidents and 53% of these involved pedestrians. In response to this data, South Africa’s amendment to their policies required employers to take reasonable and practicable measures ensuring pedestrians are prevented from injury from collisions with trackless mobile machines.

Despite South Africa’s response to the need for safer mines, the discussion to improve safety in mines began nearly a decade earlier between mine operators and original equipment manufacturers (OEMs). Mining companies recognized that OEMs can and have demonstrated improvements in equipment designs, especially when they have understood the operational and maintenance risks from the customer perspective. In 2005, this issue evolved into a formal global mining initiative, driven by a desire to fill the knowledge gap between customers and equipment designers whilst focusing on new designs where the opportunity for major change was not only possible but also more economic.

At that point, the Earth Moving Equipment Safety Round Table (EMESRT) was created. This initiative has led to productive dialogue and best practices based on the needs of both mining organizations and OEMs. Members include many of the world’s top mining companies, including Barrick, Glencore, Anglo American, and Rio Tinto.

And now Newtrax, the leading provider of IoT safety and proximity detection solutions for hard rock underground mining operations, is happy to continue collaborative dialogue and protocols as a key stakeholder of EMESRT.

EMERST L9 vehicle collision avoidance

EMESRT Vehicle Interaction Protocol Development

One of the projects EMESRT has been charged with is developing an open-architecture industry communications standard for proximity detection and vehicle interaction. In a 2015 workshop, the group of OEMs, proximity detection suppliers (PDS) and mining companies discussed a common protocol for communications between PDS and OEM devices in the mining industry.

Since its formation, EMESRT has established nine levels of Incident Preventative Controls.

  1. Site Requirements
  2. Segregation Controls
  3. Operating Procedures
  4. Authority to Operate
  5. Fitness to Operate
  6. Operating Compliance
  7. Operator Awareness
  8. Advisory Controls
  9. Intervention Controls

The ninth level (L9) of PDS solutions is the performance requirement best suited for Newtrax involvement in the group. L9 will help establish technologies that automatically intervene and take some form of machine control to prevent or mitigate an unsafe interaction.

According to a 2015 report from EMESRT, there are some levels of solutions for electric underground vehicles. Underground diesel machines have continued to lack interoperability. In fact, the development of proximity detection systems linked to the machine’s interface has been unique for each machine. This leaves a number of different challenges for operating mines. On any mine, there will never be only one brand/type of equipment. Hence the interoperability of the multiple relationships between the levels of sensing and intelligence/rules and the different vehicles is essential to achieve an overall mine site solution for the industry.

Raymond Jepson, Industrial Design, Newtrax

Making Underground Mining Safer through Industrial Design

Making Underground Mining Safer through Industrial Design

Raymond Jepson, Industrial Design, Newtrax

“I predict that we will be releasing products that set a new standard for the mining industry,” says Raymond Jepson, an Industrial Designer in R&D at Newtrax when asked about the current and future projects at Newtrax.

In the world of hardware and software for the underground mining industry, usability, reparability, and ruggedness are top concerns for our partners.  We sat down with Raymond and asked him about what he does and how he addresses these concerns.

“I always wanted to work in technology.  I got my degree from a University on the west coast of the USA with a heavy influence from the tech sector but ended up working in traditional consumer products until now,” said Raymond. “I design new enclosures for our new hardware and troubleshoot design and production problems in our current products.  Designing new hardware involves helping define the mechanical requirements of the enclosure, drawing and prototyping concepts, building the product in CAD, finding suppliers and inspecting pre-production samples.”

“How can I make this safer, more pleasant, easier to use, or more reliable.”

The user experience is what first comes to mind when asked what he’s the most passionate about. “The user experience is always my top priority, and it’s even more important in Newtrax products.  Every day I ask myself, “How can I make this safer, more pleasant, easier to use, or more reliable.”  Because of the difficulty of mining, even the small improvements represent a huge gain for our end users.” he said.

Working toward the best user experience for Raymond means addressing some of the biggest challenges our clients face.

  • The need for ruggedness
  • Reparability
  • Usability

These technical challenges inspire Jepson.  “We want our products to be the lightest, most rugged, easiest to repair and best to use.  That means having to be fanatic about every detail.” When asked how we achieve these goals, we learned that the key is the perfect combination of the right conditions. “We invest in bringing the best products to market, from product management to human resources and the product themselves.”

Digitally transform your operation today!

Speak to a Newtrax expert about how you can monitor your data in real time, improving Safety at your mine, Productivity, and reducing your Maintenance costs.

Raymond Jepson, Industrial Designer Newtrax

When we asked Raymond why having good industrial design was so crucial to the industry and miner safety, he had this to say: “Ease of use is critical when it comes to personal safety devices like cap lamps:  with so much happening in a mine where full attention is required to work, the last thing we want is for a miner to be distracted by using their cap lamp.”

Not only do the products need good design to function with ease, but Raymond also elaborated on why the choice of material is just as important. “Few environments contain more unpredictable materials than a mine:  hydraulic oil, fuel, shotcrete, explosives, cleaner and other solvents are piled up everywhere.  Any of these can cause materials to degrade, therefore we need to carefully consider where our products will be used.”

Each role is crucial to the success of a product and how it will perform in its environment.  It was easy to see that Raymond is passionate about the challenges of the underground mining industry and plays a big role in its continuous improvement.

Michael Place, Unit Manager of Granny Smith Gold Fields Mine using Newtrax Technology

Newtrax is Attending & Exhibiting at IMARC 2018

Newtrax is Attending & Exhibiting at IMARC 2018 Booth B90

Michael Place, Unit Manager of Granny Smith Gold Fields Mine using Newtrax Technology

Newtrax will be attending the International Mining and Resources Conference (IMARC) in Melbourne, Australia from October 29 to November 1st, 2018.  This is our second year attending the show, and we are very proud to be a sponsor.

Be sure to register to listen to Michael Place, Unit Manager for projects at Granny Smith Gold Fields Mine speak about his experience integrating Newtrax technology at 13:55 on Wednesday, October 31st in the Technology Theatre.

Watch the video to see what it’s all about!

Stop by Booth B90 to see what Newtrax can do for you!

Let’s meet to discuss how we can partner with your mine to achieve your KPI’s.  Click the link below to have a Newtrax representative schedule your IMARC meeting today!